books0977:

Séverine (c.1895). Louis Welden Hawkins (French, 1849-1910). Oil on canvas. Musée d’Orsay.
Although the painting alone suggests a determined modern woman writer, the representation of wheat and laurel leaves and the words Pax and Panis on the frame make Severine’s commitment clear. It had begun at a very early stage when she became the secretary of the socialist journalist and writer Jules Vallès, and continued through various publications in defence of the working-class which led her to the head of the newspaper Le Cri du Peuple from 1885 to 1888.

books0977:

Séverine (c.1895). Louis Welden Hawkins (French, 1849-1910). Oil on canvas. Musée d’Orsay.

Although the painting alone suggests a determined modern woman writer, the representation of wheat and laurel leaves and the words Pax and Panis on the frame make Severine’s commitment clear. It had begun at a very early stage when she became the secretary of the socialist journalist and writer Jules Vallès, and continued through various publications in defence of the working-class which led her to the head of the newspaper Le Cri du Peuple from 1885 to 1888.

grizandnorm:

Throwback Thursday on Tuesday tips

Hi, I’ve been getting emails asking about color.  My approach is to make it as simple as possible.  It is a lot easier to control a limited pallete.  There is no need to put all the color in the world in one painting.  In fact, a painting with a controlled pallete is more beautiful can look very colorful and dynamic.

Color Pallete: The simpler the better.


There are several go to color combination that we all know.
triadic
secondary triadic
tertiary 
monochromatic 
complementary
split complementary.

My favorite one is split complementary.  As a rule of thumb, I use one general color for most of the painting, then another color in a smaller percentage, then one color as accent.
Also, we will be at wondercon this weekend.  Stop by to SP-32.
See you there,
Griz

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toerning:

I needed to do a self-portrait for a thing, and for once I actually liked how it turned out.  There’s a funny thing that happens when you make a self-portrait; like you don’t want to idealize yourself, but at the same time you don’t want to be self-deprecating, you know?  I usually just phone it in and go super-cartoony, but I wanted to try something different for this one.  I think it’s pretty true to spirit, if not likeness.  You will never see me without a scarf, not even in the summer.

toerning:

I needed to do a self-portrait for a thing, and for once I actually liked how it turned out.  There’s a funny thing that happens when you make a self-portrait; like you don’t want to idealize yourself, but at the same time you don’t want to be self-deprecating, you know?  I usually just phone it in and go super-cartoony, but I wanted to try something different for this one.  I think it’s pretty true to spirit, if not likeness.  You will never see me without a scarf, not even in the summer.

What?

What?

artemisdreaming:

War and We, 1917-23, National Museum, Warsaw
Edward Okuń  (Polish, 1872–1945)

artemisdreaming:

War and We, 1917-23, National Museum, Warsaw

Edward Okuń  (Polish, 1872–1945)

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